Tsap of a soldier with a beak and into the nest

Tsap of a soldier with a beak and into the nest ...


Skyhook System Inventor - Robert I. Fulton

First, the scout, who was awaiting evacuation, was thrown from a flying airplane a metal container weighing 150 kg. He was wearing warm overalls and a special “strapping” that the intelligence officer had to put on, a helium balloon, a mini-balloon inflated by this helium, and a 150 m. Nylon cord. One end of the cord was attached to the mini-balloon, and the other - to the harness.

So the evacuee was firmly connected to the mini-balloon, the only task of which was to keep the nylon cable in a tense state. The mini-balloon could not tear a person off the ground, although in a strong wind sometimes he dragged his body along a smooth icy or snow-covered surface.
The towing plane had special “mustache-plugs” in the nose, which with a speed of about 220 km / h intercepted the stretched nylon cord. The mini-balloon was cut off, and the cord was automatically reeled up with a winch that lifted the person on board the aircraft.

Reducing the impact of overload on a person when lifting with the help of this system is achieved through the use of a special suit and the elastic properties of a nylon cable.

For the first time such a system of non-stop reception of cargo from the ground was demonstrated in August 1958; then a converted B-17 bomber took part in the experiments.


B-17 at Point Barrow. May 1962.

The first person raised on board the aircraft in "conditions close to combat" was the sergeant of the American Marine Corps Levi Woods. It happened on August 12, 1958.
In the following weeks, the "sky hook" was tested in various conditions of use: on the water, in the mountains, in a forest area.
Feedback was positive. The system was adopted and used by US special forces during combat and clandestine operations by the CIA.

In the summer of 1962, the system was tested in the combat conditions of the Arctic, during the operation of the US Navy “Coldfeed” to research and collect materials at the abandoned Soviet drifting Arctic stations SP-8.

“From the beginning the load was lifted, then LeShak’s turn came. As soon as the balloon pulled the cable, whose weight was almost equal to the lifting force of the balloon itself, it pulled away from the surface and slid over the ice floe.Any attempts to stop the dangerous glide were unsuccessful, but the plane managed to pick up the cable in time. These problems further complicated the operation: the person was in limbo for about six and a half minutes, at a speed of 125 knots, in an icy Arctic wind. There were serious difficulties with breathing, but LeShak managed to get aboard without dangerous consequences. The rise of Smith was more successful. Considering what had just happened, he used a Soviet tractor as an anchor to haul dragging across the ice. At 20:18, the climb was successfully completed and at 2:15 am on June 3, two people were warmly welcomed to Barrow, where P2V also returned.

All the data collected - more than 300 photographs taken at SP-8, 83 documents and 21 equipment samples were investigated by ONI - the US Naval Intelligence. The experts were very impressed with the progress made by the Soviets in oceanographic and meteorological programs, which they found to be highly developed and superior in many respects to their own American ones. This was stated in an article in the November issue of ONI magazine in 1962 (John Cadwalader, "Operation Coldfeet: An Investigation of the Soviet Union Driving Station NP 8," ONI Review 17 (August 1962): pp. 344-55).
Much equipment was mass production and often superior to the American. The only information that became known about the navigation system of submarines concerned electric generators: they were installed in such a way that allowed them to work with the greatest possible silence - a detail corresponding to the technologies of construction of submarines. In total, Operation Coldfeet cost about $ 60,000, exceeding twice the planned budget due to poorly flying conditions. ”

Somewhat later, similar experiments were conducted with the involvement of the Grumman S2F1 Sentinel and P2V Neptune aircraft. Two P2V equipped with the Fulton Heavenly Hook system were based in Europe and two more in Taiwan.

Experiments with the "Hercules" began in 1965 at the Pope airbase. The first MS-130 was transferred to the 314th transport wing in the same year, and at the end of 1965 four C-130s equipped with the Fulton system were transferred to Vietnam at the Nha Trang air base. The aircraft provided for the actions of the Green Berets, and their crews were assigned to the command of the special forces of the Air Force.

The company Lockheed was able to allocate 17 "Hercules" special forces only after the deployment of full-scale mass production of C-130.These vehicles were upgraded under the River Klamp program; in the Air Force they received the designation C-1301 Skyhawk, later replaced by the Combat Talon MS-130. They installed an inertial navigation system, radar following the terrain of the APQ-144, warning equipment for electromagnetic radiation, but the "highlight" of these aircraft was the Fulton system, designed to pick up people and cargo from the earth's surface without landing the aircraft.

Before taking on board a person or cargo from an aircraft, a container with rescue equipment, which includes a tether system, a 150-meter-long nylon cable and a small balloon filled with helium from a special balloon, is dropped. In the nose of the C-130 fuselage are mounted sliding "mustache" rods. In a cruise flight, the rods collapse along the sides of the fuselage; before loading, the rods are moved apart. The cable from the container is attached to the payload, after which the balloon is filled with helium, as a result, the cable is lifted up with a ball and takes a vertical position.

The plane at a speed of 240-270 km / h comes to pickup below the height of the ball so that the cable is in the alignment of the "whiskers".Bars "whiskers" automatically fold, clamping the cable. The lower part of the cable under the action of the velocity head is deflected to the rear of the fuselage, where it is captured by a special device by the crew of the aircraft and on the winch the cargo or person is pulled through the open rear ramp into the cargo compartment.

MS-130 performed flights on dumping and receiving people and goods in Laos, Cambodia, North and South Vietnam. And today, little is known about the participation of these machines in the fighting. Usually planes flew alone, at night and at extremely low altitudes. Flying deep into the territory of the DRV was not uncommon.

It is known that airplanes even landed improvised runways prepared for them in the deep rear of the Communists. Together with the “Hercules,” the same tasks were performed by several similarly upgraded C-123s, called “Duck Hawk”. Most often, MC-130 and C-123 flew from the Khe San, Nakhon and Phan border bases.

Due to the fact that this method of rescue is not considered to be completely safe due to possible injury, it is planned to use it only in extreme cases.

In the foreign press, it is noted that when using the upgraded Fulton system, it is now possible to simultaneously rescue in a similar way up to six people or a weight of up to 680 kg.

Fulton's system "Heavenly hook" is now in service with US special forces. About a similar Soviet system, unfortunately there is no information.

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  • Tsap of a soldier with a beak and into the nest

    Tsap of a soldier with a beak and into the nest


    Tsap of a soldier with a beak and into the nest

    Tsap of a soldier with a beak and into the nest


    Tsap of a soldier with a beak and into the nest

    Tsap of a soldier with a beak and into the nest


    Tsap of a soldier with a beak and into the nest

    Tsap of a soldier with a beak and into the nest


    Tsap of a soldier with a beak and into the nest

    Tsap of a soldier with a beak and into the nest


    Tsap of a soldier with a beak and into the nest

    Tsap of a soldier with a beak and into the nest


    Tsap of a soldier with a beak and into the nest

    Tsap of a soldier with a beak and into the nest


    Tsap of a soldier with a beak and into the nest

    Tsap of a soldier with a beak and into the nest


    Tsap of a soldier with a beak and into the nest

    Tsap of a soldier with a beak and into the nest


    Tsap of a soldier with a beak and into the nest

    Tsap of a soldier with a beak and into the nest


    Tsap of a soldier with a beak and into the nest

    Tsap of a soldier with a beak and into the nest


    Tsap of a soldier with a beak and into the nest

    Tsap of a soldier with a beak and into the nest


    Tsap of a soldier with a beak and into the nest

    Tsap of a soldier with a beak and into the nest


    Tsap of a soldier with a beak and into the nest

    Tsap of a soldier with a beak and into the nest


    Tsap of a soldier with a beak and into the nest

    Tsap of a soldier with a beak and into the nest


    Tsap of a soldier with a beak and into the nest

    Tsap of a soldier with a beak and into the nest


    Tsap of a soldier with a beak and into the nest

    Tsap of a soldier with a beak and into the nest


    Tsap of a soldier with a beak and into the nest

    Tsap of a soldier with a beak and into the nest


    Tsap of a soldier with a beak and into the nest

    Tsap of a soldier with a beak and into the nest


    Tsap of a soldier with a beak and into the nest

    Tsap of a soldier with a beak and into the nest