The whole truth about scalps

The whole truth about scalps

December 22, 2014

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This photo depicts an American Robert McGee, who went down in history in 1864 when Robert was a child, the Sioux chief named Little Turtle, who attacked the convoy of colonists, lifted the scalp from him alive. He miraculously survived, lived to a respectable age, but the mark of scalping remained with him forever.

However, contrary to popular myth, the first to remove the scalps were not the Indians, but the Europeans, followed by the Americans. It is known that in the 11th century, Count Wessex (one of the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms) had the custom to collect scalps of defeated enemies. When the British began to move to the New World, they "took" this custom along with them.
July 26, 1722 in Boston, a declaration was promulgated proclaiming war to the Indians. One of its points was a provision that ordered the issuance of rewards for scalps removed from the Indians as direct evidence of their killing. For each scalp warrior (a priori considered to be removed from the Indian) could have gotten 100 pounds. A lot of money! The female, old-age, or children's scalp cost less, but this did not stop the scalp hunters.During the French and Native American Wars, the British promised 200 pounds to the one who would extract the scalp of the Delaware supreme leader. This amount was 25 times higher than what was promised to the Allied Indians for the scalp of the French soldier.

Europeans made scalping a way of commercially stimulating Indians and whites to serve on one or another of the belligerents. The scalp could be turned into money, exchanged for weapons and necessary goods. And if, before the Boston Declaration, dead enemies were scalped, then after it, for the sake of greater speed, quantity, and gain, both whites and Indians began to scalp their victims alive. Such torture was extremely painful, and in the overwhelming majority of cases resulted in death from painful shock or blood loss. It was under such a distribution that Robert McGee fell.

The practice of rewarding scalps continued until the 19th century, until the people's indignation did not force the government to stop such barbarism.

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  • The whole truth about scalps

    The whole truth about scalps

    The whole truth about scalps

    The whole truth about scalps

    The whole truth about scalps

    The whole truth about scalps

    The whole truth about scalps

    The whole truth about scalps

    The whole truth about scalps

    The whole truth about scalps

    The whole truth about scalps

    The whole truth about scalps

    The whole truth about scalps

    The whole truth about scalps

    The whole truth about scalps

    The whole truth about scalps

    The whole truth about scalps

    The whole truth about scalps

    The whole truth about scalps

    The whole truth about scalps

    The whole truth about scalps

    The whole truth about scalps

    The whole truth about scalps