Sea nomads who almost never go to land

Sea nomads who almost never go to land

In Southeast Asia, home to the nomadic people of the Bago sailors, who survived the 2004 notorious earthquake that caused a tsunami in the Indian Ocean with almost no victims. And all because these “sea gypsies” have adapted to live in the sea, going ashore only in order to bury their dead.

James Morgan, a photographer and anthropologist by education, made a selection of photographs, thereby documenting the existence of this unique people:

The Bajo or Malays ethnic group lived in the sea for centuries, mainly in Malaysia, the Philippines and Indonesia.

1

Baggio traditionally settled in boats called "lepa-lepa", made by hand. They have everything that is necessary for nomads to live: kitchen utensils, kerosene lamps, food, drinking water and even plants. On the beach bajo descend in order to sell or buy the necessary goods or repair the boat.

2

Baggio survives due to underwater hunting - they are first-class freedivers and can dive without a scuba diving to a depth of thirty meters in search of sea bass, pearls and sea cucumbers.

3

Scuba diving becomes a daily workout of the bajo from an early age, so their eardrums are often broken, sometimes deliberately.

4

This way of life is fraught with many dangers. Many fishermen become crippled or die from decompression sickness. This decompression sickness occurs when a person dives and then rises to the surface before the body releases pressure.

5

Every year, the people of Baggio are becoming increasingly difficult to live in the sea, because fish stocks are almost depleted due to uncontrolled fishing.

6

Sea gypsies make a living primarily by trading in sea bass or napoleon fish by selling them to Hong Kong fishing companies.

7

Illegal fishing practices using dynamite baggio were taught by soldiers during World War II. Since then, they have been causing great damage to their habitat.

8

On top of that, they are fishing with potassium cyanide, which is released from plastic bottles directly onto a school of fish. Cyanide paralyzes the fish, which makes it possible to sell it still alive.However, this method of fishing poisons the entire coral reef that feeds the bajo.

9

Alas, but it turns out a vicious circle: in order to at least earn a living, the fishermen have to catch a huge amount of fish, obeying the requirements of an insatiable world market, at the same time destroying the population of fish and reefs.

10

The fish gets to Hong Kong enterprises, where it is pumped with steroids, so that it remains alive. Asian restaurants are willing to pay huge sums for live fish.

11

In recent years, the government has forced sea nomads to move to dry land, which is why they can lose their culture forever. Often bajo are not in trouble with the governments of different countries, because in search of a rich catch, they can cross the international border.

12

Since the culture of the nomads is clearly nearing sunset, after the death of the current generation, no one will live in the sea. In recent years, the young people of the Baggio are increasingly leaving their settlements in search of work in the city.

13

However, it remains to hope that the situation with the situation of sea gypsies will improve. WWF and the International Society for the Conservation of Nature organize various programs for the rational use of marine resources.

14

The publication of the photographs of James Morgan in the South China Morning Post caused a wide public response to the trade situation between Hong Kong as the main consumer of fish and the people of Baggio.

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  • Sea nomads who almost never go to land

    Sea nomads who almost never go to land

    Sea nomads who almost never go to land

    Sea nomads who almost never go to land

    Sea nomads who almost never go to land

    Sea nomads who almost never go to land

    Sea nomads who almost never go to land

    Sea nomads who almost never go to land

    Sea nomads who almost never go to land

    Sea nomads who almost never go to land

    Sea nomads who almost never go to land

    Sea nomads who almost never go to land

    Sea nomads who almost never go to land

    Sea nomads who almost never go to land

    Sea nomads who almost never go to land

    Sea nomads who almost never go to land

    Sea nomads who almost never go to land

    Sea nomads who almost never go to land

    Sea nomads who almost never go to land

    Sea nomads who almost never go to land

    Sea nomads who almost never go to land

    Sea nomads who almost never go to land

    Sea nomads who almost never go to land

    Sea nomads who almost never go to land

    Sea nomads who almost never go to land

    Sea nomads who almost never go to land

    Sea nomads who almost never go to land

    Sea nomads who almost never go to land

    Sea nomads who almost never go to land

    Sea nomads who almost never go to land

    Sea nomads who almost never go to land

    Sea nomads who almost never go to land

    Sea nomads who almost never go to land

    Sea nomads who almost never go to land

    Sea nomads who almost never go to land

    Sea nomads who almost never go to land

    Sea nomads who almost never go to land

    Sea nomads who almost never go to land

    Sea nomads who almost never go to land

    Sea nomads who almost never go to land

    Sea nomads who almost never go to land

    Sea nomads who almost never go to land

    Sea nomads who almost never go to land

    Sea nomads who almost never go to land

    Sea nomads who almost never go to land

    Sea nomads who almost never go to land