Neptune Post

Neptune Post

Legend has it that the inventor of this method of communication was the Greek philosopher Theophrast, who in about 310 BC. er he threw several sealed vessels with notes behind Gibraltar to prove that the water from the Atlantic enters the Mediterranean. A few months later one of the vessels was found in Sicily.

Some interesting facts

- The navigator and discoverer Christopher Columbus on his way to India sent reports to the Spanish queen Isabella, securely corking them in bottles and throwing them into the ocean. Some of these messages, persecuted by the currents, were caught from the water and delivered to the palace of Her Majesty. One of the bottles of Columbus was picked up in the Strait of Gibraltar in 1852 by the captain of an American vessel.

- In England, from 1590 until the end of the 18th century, there was a law, according to which everyone who dares to break the sealed bottle caught in the sea or a sealed bottle found on the shore. To read such messages at the court, the position of “uncorker of ocean bottles” was established.The first uncorker at the court of Queen Elizabeth I was Lord Thomas Tonfild, who in the first year of his tenure took out 52 letters from bottles. According to some reports, when he came to the queen with the next report, she invariably asked him: “Well, what does Neptune write to us?”

- The messages in the bottle as a way to send messages are still used by residents of some Indonesian islands.

- Until 1983, the longest bottle drift was considered to be the bottle sent in 1909 from the board of the Russian gunboat “Manjour” (see the Koreatek type) for studying sea currents: it was picked up near Bering Island (Commander Islands) in 1967. On June 6, 1983, the record was broken: a bottle of lotion thrown from an English steamer “Arawatt” off the coast of Australia in 1910 was found on the island of Morton.

- In 2005, 88 immigrants were rescued in Costa Rica, who sent in a bottle to the open sea a message about the wreck of their vessel. Fortunately, the message quickly got into the net of a local fisherman.

A letter in a bottle traveled from Canada to Croatia in 28 years.

Eight entertaining stories about the messages in a bottle

A message in a bottle was thrown onto the coast of Croatia 28 years after being thrown into the sea in Nova Scotia, Canada.The bottle was discovered by a group of surfers who cleaned the beach in Neretva, near Dubrovnik in the very south of Croatia.
Members of the surfing clubs “Spilt” and “Komin” stumbled upon a pile of old broken bottles when they were cleaning the beach, preparing it for the new season. In one of these bottles, the young Mateo Medak-Rezits saw the note.
The letter said: “Mary, you are really an amazing person. I hope that we can correspond. I told you that I would write. Always your friend, Jonathan. Nova Scotia, 85 ".
A letter with a bottle made a magnificent path across the Atlantic Ocean, along the currents of Gibraltar, crossed the Mediterranean Sea before finally the Adriatic Sea threw them onto the Dalmatian coast. In a straight line the length of this journey was about 4,000 miles (almost 6,500 km.) In a straight line, but apparently the bottle made its way at least five times longer.

World record: the message in the bottle was found 97 years after it was sent

Eight entertaining stories about the messages in a bottle

The letter in the bottle, which swayed on the waves for almost a century, set a new world record, judging by the records in the Guinness book. A 97-year-old letter, found not far from the Scottish Islands, drifted in a bottle over the seas for the longest time of all the letters found.
It fell into the fishing net of the Scottish captain Andrew Leeper, who compared his discovery with "winning the lottery." Quite by chance, the 43-year-old captain was leading the same vessel (Scottish "Copious"), on which the previous record was set. Mark Anderson, who found the first letter, was also on board when they took out a bottle.
The letter was thrown into the water in June 1914 by Captain C. Brown of the School of Navigation in Glasgow, it contained a postcard promising a 6 pence reward to anyone who found it.

A letter in a bottle, which was answered 24 years later

Eight entertaining stories about the messages in a bottle

The German boy received an answer to his letter almost a quarter of a century after he threw away a bottle of message from a ship to the Baltic Sea. A 13-year-old Russian boy, Daniel Korotkikh, was walking with his parents on the beach when he noticed something brilliant in the sand. “I saw this bottle and it interested me,” says Daniel. “It looked like a German beer bottle with a ceramic stopper, but inside it turned out to be a letter.”
His father knows German and translated a message neatly wrapped in cellophane and tied with a medical bandage. It read: “My name is Frank, I'm five years old. My father and I are sailing to Denmark.If you find this letter, please reply me, and I will answer you. " The letter is dated 1987, it contained an address in the city of Coesfeld.
The boy who wrote the letter is named Frank Oisbeck and he is now 29. His parents still live at the address indicated in the letter. A Russian boy and a German man saw each other using the Internet. Short Oisbek showed a bottle in which he found the letter.

Message in a bottle, returned to the family of the sender after 76 years

Eight entertaining stories about the messages in a bottle

A letter in a bottle, thrown into the sea 76 years ago, was found in New Zealand and returned to the family of the person who wrote it. A bottle with a letter inside in November 2012 found Jeff Flood. The letter said: “In the sea. I ask the person who finds this letter to send it to the address indicated with the date and place where you found it. ”
The letter was dated March 17 and thrown into the sea in 1936 by Herbert Ernest Hillbrick; he left his address and name on the letter. Mr. Flood found this letter on the beach in New Zealand.
Mr. Flood found out that the author of the letter died in the 40s of the twentieth century, but his grandson, Peter Hillbrick, lives in Australia. This letter has been hanging out in the ocean for 76 years.

Captured team escaped from pirates by sending a message in a bottle

Eight entertaining stories about the messages in a bottle

In 2011, a team from a stolen cargo ship was rescued by British commandos after sending a letter to its rescuers in a bottle. Captured seamen, locked in the armored hold of a vessel seized by pirates, threw their letter into the sea when two NATO ships came to free them.
A letter saying that they were alive was fished out of the ocean before the storming of the ship began. All crew members were rescued, and the pirates were arrested.

Message in a bottle, which 30 years later answered via Facebook

Eight entertaining stories about the messages in a bottle

Oliver Vandvall, who sent a message in a bottle about 30 years ago, finally got an answer when a Facebook user found a Belgian on the social network.
During a family voyage along the southern coast of England at the age of 14, Vandvall sent a page from his notebook to swing on the waves in a wine bottle. Thirty-three years later, Lorain Yates found a bottle thrown on the bank of Sanagi in Dorset and the Belgian waited for an answer. True, instead of writing to the address indicated, Yates found Vandvall on Facebook.
The 47-year-old Vandvall admitted: “It was so long ago that at first I wanted to answer,“ This is not my letter. ” But then I remembered. ”In a note, Vandvall describes himself like this: "I am a boy of 14 years old and my home in Belgium." And further: “I do not know who you are, child, woman or man. I am on a ship, 18 meters long. It is called "Tamaris". I am writing this letter, and we have just circled Cape Portland on the southern coast of England. We set sail this morning. ”
The two sons of Vandvall tried to repeat the amazing story of his father, but he doubts that they will succeed. “They were stupid and did not write their address, therefore, the chances of getting an answer are practically nil,” said their father.

A letter that was found 40 years later in Sequoia National Park

Eight entertaining stories about the messages in a bottle

An old rusty tin lay in the ground for 40 years before something appeared on the surface that the sharp-eyed eye of Larry Wright, 69, of Oakland in California, could see.
Walking along Milestone Mountain in Sequoia National Park with his son Aaron and grandson Skyler, Wright saw something that turned out to be a film box buried in the ground. Inside was a perfectly preserved handwritten note dated August 17, 1972. It read:
“Tim Taylor conquered this peak on August 17, 1972 at the age of 13.Someone who has found this note, please write. "
Fascinated by the optimism of the note, Wright began the search for Taylor, which took a month. He began by visiting the house indicated in the note. The new owner, Koichi Uemura, said that his family has been living in this house for 18 years. Uemura clarified that they are the third to buy this house after the Taylors.
Wright also tried to search the polls and google lists, but nothing came of it until he turned to the local newspaper La Cañada Valley Sun. They published a story about the discovery of Wright and Taylor, now the Supreme Court judge in San Diego, relatives and friends began to call.
Taylor said that on the day he buried the letter, he traveled with a scout squad. The boy decided to independently climb an unknown peak with a height of 12,000 feet; it was not marked on his boy scout map. He also said that it was his father who instilled in him the habit of leaving messages so that someone would find them.

Two women became pen-friends by finding a letter in a bottle sent 40 years ago.

Eight entertaining stories about the messages in a bottle

Rosalind Hirs met her friend from the United States 40 years ago after finding her letter in a bottle on the beach.The American Sandra Morris threw a letter into the ocean from a ship and brought it to shore in Margam (South Wales). Women, both of whom are already 48 years old, are still in correspondence.

Bottled love
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Eyck Viking was a lonely Swedish sailor who decided to put the responsibility of finding his “half” into the wild. He wrote a simple letter with the address of the “Faraway Beauty,” cooed it into a bottle and threw it into the sea in the hope that the young woman would find the message and become his wife.

Two years later, in 1958, Eyck was amazed to receive a letter from a girl from Sicily named Paolina. She wrote: "I am not a beauty, but it seems like a miracle how a small bottle was in my hands, so I decided to answer you." The guy and the young lady began to correspond and a year later, Eyck came to Sicily to take Paolina as his wife.

The Tale of the Fisherman and the Bottle
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It was 1999. Fisherman Steve Gowan, as usual in the mornings, dragged a seine from the sea. Something got tangled in the networks, noted Steve. Something turned out to be a bottle, very old and containing two letters written by ordinary Thomas Hughes and dated September 9, 1914. In one of the letters there was a request to send the second message to the wife of a soldier, Elizabeth.A simple love letter from a draftee sailing to France to fight in the First World civilization attempt to commit suicide.

After reading the letters, Gowen felt a high personal responsibility. It is clear that Mrs. Hughes died, the fisherman mused, but heirs remained. Rozyskom which Steve and took up. He soon learned that Thomas and Elizabeth have a daughter, Emily, who lives and lives in Auckland (New Zealand).

Alas, Tom Hughes himself fell in battle a couple of days after sending bottle mail. Emily in 1914 was only two years old, and she absolutely did not remember her own father. Only the stories of the mother and the posthumous awards reminded her of Pope Tom.

Steve Gowan contacted New Zealand's postal service, and she agreed to pay for his flight to the country so that Steve could hand over bottle letters to his aged daughter Hughes.

Emily was very pleased. And that is modestly said.

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