German television: Get used to power outages

German television: Get used to power outages

A couple of days ago, the German television company ARD released a program about the state of the German electricity grid and power engineering in general. In general, in connection with the transition to green energy, the Germans were offeredget used to the groundget used to the constant outages. Packed with generators, flashlights and be prepared for the fact that there will be no products in the next supermarket.

Here in German -(if you include subtitles and Google translation, then it is even clear that they speak in a partially native, but completely unfamiliar to me language)

Here is a retelling on the move -

Public television ARD released a program on the state of the power system in Germany, which about 15 years ago was by far the most stable in the world. But this stability is already forgotten due to the rise of green technologies.

The ARD report basically says that the public and industry need to quickly prepare for power cuts, because the country's energy system is more unstable than ever.

Only last week there was a blackout due to a winter storm that engulfed a significant part of Germany: 300,000 people were left without electricity.

Millions of loss outages

But power outages have increased even on days with calm weather. Last year, November 16, reports ARD, the entire city of Wiesbaden was turned off for 25 minutes. City engineer-operator Frank Rolle does not remember that this happened ever in 45 years of his work. "Suddenly, the 219,000 inhabitants of Wiesbaden's electricity disappeared."

Many of us may be tempted to think: what kind of problem is to live without electricity for 25 minutes. Perishable foods in the freezer or refrigerator will not be affected in the end. Will you think?

But, as reported by ARD, such a power outage is in fact an extremely costly affair for industry and business. For example, Hajo Hagens’s manager said the power outage cost his company about half a million euros, and it took a whole day to restore production and start it up again and set it up the way it should be.

Glass manufacturer Schott also reported that losses are measured in "millions of euros," according to ARD.

Backup systems are too expensive

As Germany’s energy supply becomes increasingly volatile, many companies are finding out that backup systems are simply too expensive for them. According to Peter Bartholomus, industrial park manager:

This would be so costly, especially in such energy-intensive industries as the chemical industry, that would affect the ability to compete. That is why we simply cannot build a double or triple reserve stock. No one can pay for it. ”

The network is "extremely overloaded"

ARD recognizes that the German power system is becoming "increasingly vulnerable." According to the Tennet power grid operator, the network is “extremely susceptible to stress.” The culprit: "Energiewende" (transition to green energy).

Amprion, the second largest network operator in Germany, wrote to ARD:

In order to maintain a stable grid performance, we have to intervene more and more often. ”

473 outages daily

Hans-Peter Erbring Gridlab GmbH informs ARD that the German and European energy systems "work daily at the limit." ARD adds that on average, 473 outages occur every day in Germany.

Then, ARD describes a blackout in Germany in November 2005, where in some places there was no electricity for many days due to a strong snow flurry.

Officials: learn to live with it!

Germany’s power supply attracted the attention of high-ranking German government officials. Christopher Unger of the Department for Disaster Protection in Frederil informs ARD that Germany is “poorly prepared for blackouts” and that people in general need to “wake up” and be prepared for the reality of possible outages that Germany is not used to seeing.

One might think that with the unstable energy situation in Germany, leading officials will do something to solve the problem. Unfortunately, this is not the case, since they seem to be quite satisfactory for the unpredictable operation of the network. This is perceived as an inevitable payment for green energy.

Ralph Ackermann of the Fire Department Association in the state of Hesse says that people should be aware that the local store may be closed and that it is a good idea to have a flashlight at hand.

ARD summarizes:

It is time to prepare for power outages.

In other words, the days of Germany, the times of a stable energy network are over and it is not expected that they will ever return.

Of course, ARD studios and government offices will have backup generators needed for the period of a power outage.As for the rest of the citizens, they will have to take care of themselves.

A source:

Check out the triple burden on the economy.

First, Germany is building a green energy industry, which seems to be working. Then the normal energy is built / maintained next to it, which is turned on when the green energy is messed up. Then, next to each farmer and the plant sets itself a backup energy, which turns on when the normal energy does not have time to save the system when the green energy fits.

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  • German television: Get used to power outages

    German television: Get used to power outages

    German television: Get used to power outages

    German television: Get used to power outages

    German television: Get used to power outages

    German television: Get used to power outages

    German television: Get used to power outages

    German television: Get used to power outages

    German television: Get used to power outages

    German television: Get used to power outages

    German television: Get used to power outages German television: Get used to power outages German television: Get used to power outages German television: Get used to power outages German television: Get used to power outages German television: Get used to power outages German television: Get used to power outages German television: Get used to power outages German television: Get used to power outages German television: Get used to power outages German television: Get used to power outages German television: Get used to power outages German television: Get used to power outages German television: Get used to power outages German television: Get used to power outages German television: Get used to power outages German television: Get used to power outages