Best pictures for August from National Geographic

Best pictures for August from National Geographic

Mumbai Railway Station

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Beaver vancouver

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The beaver is the largest rodent of the Old World fauna and the second largest rodent after capybaras (Photo by Paul Colangelo):

Luriki, Svalbard

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Lurik many suffer from environmental pollution, especially from accidents oil tankers. However, due to their specialization in crustaceans, they are not very sensitive to the decline in fish populations due to human fishing. (Photo by Paul Nicklen):

Tiger in the valley of the Brahmaputra

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The stripes of a tiger will well mask him in tall grass. (Photo by Sandesh Kadur):

Bayterek Monument, Astana

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This monument in the capital of Kazakhstan is one of the main attractions of the city. The height of the structure is 97 meters, with a ball crowning the structure - 105 meters. The diameter of the ball - 22 meters. (Photo by Gerd Ludwig):

Yakarsky Caiman, Brazil

05

With the onset of the dry season, the schools of fish leave the small ponds of the Pantanal and head towards deeper rivers, often falling directly into the mouth of hungry caimans. (Photo by Luciano Candisani):

Ratcliff-on-Soar Power Station, UK

06

Ratcliffe-on-Soar, a coal-fired power plant produces electricity, which will be enough for almost two million people. The station building has been towering over Notting Hampshire for more than forty years - but people rarely pay attention to it. (Photo by Toby Smith):

Lion "Nursery", Serengeti

07

Grown up babies, like these lion cubs from the Wumbi Pride, all live together in the "manger": the females of the same pride, united in their goal to raise a new generation, are caring for and looking after their own and other siblings. (Photo by Michael Nichols):

Dive in the cenote of Holtoun, Mexico

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The archaeologist Guillermo de Anda plunges into the center of Holtún on July 19, a few minutes before the sun reaches its zenith. Twice a year the luminary takes the highest point in the sky - and at that moment the light pierces the water at the bottom of the cenote at a right angle, and the shadows disappear. De Anda believes that on the surface of the ancient Maya erected a structure that just "caught" the rays of light. (Photo by Paul Niklen):

Red-eyed tree frog, Costa Rica

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During a photo tour in Costa Rica, Megan Lorenz really wanted to take a picture of the red-eyed tree frog. Closer to twilight luck smiled at her: the frog clambered onto the next branch.Staggering, he grabbed a mushroom stem to balance it, and then quickly crawled away. (Photo by Megan Lorenz):

Barsuki, Finland

010

On a summer night, the family of badgers sneaks into the kitchen through its own private tunnel, which opens onto a fireplace. It took Fagerstrom four years to catch the shy night animals. For this picture, he installed the camera on the windowsill, and he stood for several hours on the stairs outside the window, waiting for the shutter to be pressed using the remote control. (Photo by Kai Fagerstrom):

Little fox, Kamchatka

011

“Kronotsky State Reserve. I met this fox the day after a strong hurricane. A snowstorm swept all night and there was heavy snowfall. And in the morning, as if in compensation for yesterday’s anxiety, it was unusually quiet and sunny. The fiery beauty of a light dancing trot moved along a snow-white veil, on which there were almost no tracks. During the movement, it accelerated, then cautiously faded away, catching snowy smells, “- says the photographer Gennady Yusin. (Photo by Gennady Yusin):

Gentoo Penguin, Antarctica

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The gentoo penguin does not dare to swim: a sea leopard can wait for it in the water. Penguin stays in shallow water, trying to assess the situation. (Photo by Paul Niklen):

Cenote, Mexico

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A diver explores the cenote near the ruins of Tulum - the ancient Mayan city. (Photo by Paul Niklen):

Cubs of Yakar Caiman, Brazil

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Two-week Yakar crocodile caimans barely reach two dozen centimeters. During the day, the little ones are hiding from predators in the midst of high marsh grasses, and, sensing danger, make an alarming cry, calling for the help of adults. (Photo by Luciano Candisani):

Ghost Bear, Canada

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The population of Kermood bears numbers from 400 to 1000 individuals. Bears survived in our days partly due to Indian tribes, who always kept the existence of the white-faced secret from the hunters. (Photo by Paul Niklen):

Beaver, France

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The beaver goes to his dam on the Loire River, holding a poplar branch in his teeth for dinner. A century earlier, hunters practically exterminated the species all over the world: only 1,200 individuals remained. Today, the population of these protected rodents has grown to a million, and they mostly live in Europe. (Photo by Louis-Marie Pro):

Sovyonok, Russia

017

“Wandering over the hills in search of mushrooms, I heard the raspy cry of a polar owl. So somewhere here is her chicks. I look around carefully - there is nothing. And then I notice a scared, but attentive look. Owlet. It seems to be different in color from the environment, but it is very difficult to notice. And if it were not for these bright yellow, huge eyes ... "- says the photographer.

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  • Best pictures for August from National Geographic

    Best pictures for August from National Geographic

    Best pictures for August from National Geographic

    Best pictures for August from National Geographic

    Best pictures for August from National Geographic

    Best pictures for August from National Geographic

    Best pictures for August from National Geographic

    Best pictures for August from National Geographic

    Best pictures for August from National Geographic

    Best pictures for August from National Geographic

    Best pictures for August from National Geographic Best pictures for August from National Geographic Best pictures for August from National Geographic Best pictures for August from National Geographic Best pictures for August from National Geographic Best pictures for August from National Geographic Best pictures for August from National Geographic Best pictures for August from National Geographic Best pictures for August from National Geographic Best pictures for August from National Geographic Best pictures for August from National Geographic Best pictures for August from National Geographic Best pictures for August from National Geographic Best pictures for August from National Geographic Best pictures for August from National Geographic Best pictures for August from National Geographic Best pictures for August from National Geographic Best pictures for August from National Geographic Best pictures for August from National Geographic Best pictures for August from National Geographic Best pictures for August from National Geographic Best pictures for August from National Geographic Best pictures for August from National Geographic Best pictures for August from National Geographic