10 km without a parachute: what to do if you fell out of an airplane

10 km without a parachute: what to do if you fell out of an airplane

6:59:00 The height of 10,000 meters

Your flight can be called late night, and you want - early morning. After takeoff, you were attached to sleep, and suddenly wake up from the burning icy wind. And this sound is a heartbreaking, deafening roar. "Where I am? “You think. And where did the plane go?”

You are at a height of ten kilometers above the ground. All alone. And fall.

The situation is bad. But now it would be better to focus on the positive aspects (not counting the main thing - that you at least somehow managed to survive your plane). Earthly attraction to you is now a fierce enemy, but then you have another ally - time. Believe it or not, your current situation is much better than if you had fallen from the fifth floor balcony. More precisely, your position will be better. In the meantime, problems with oxygen at this altitude will lead to hypoxia and loss of consciousness, and a couple of kilometers you will fall like a brick.

Then the consciousness will return, and then try to remember this article. However, in any case, the final stop, that is, the earth, you can not miss.

To reduce the speed of free fall, try to imitate a skydiver performing a long jump. Arrange your arms and legs, tilt your head back, straighten your shoulders. Make your chest a wheel, and you yourself will turn to face the earth. Just do not relax - this is not the best posture for landing.
It makes no sense to argue that the chances of survival when falling from a ten-kilometer height are not so much, but at the moment you still have nothing to do and no one bothers to think about your own situation. You can fall from an airplane in two ways. The first of these is free fall without any attempt to slow down your flight. The second is to play the role of "rider on the ruins." This term put into circulation Jim Hamilton, a Massachusetts amateur historian, who created the page of "researchers of free fall." This is an extensive database that includes almost all cases of a fall from a great height. "Rider" in his terminology is the one who managed to grab hold of some debris.So, in 1972, the Serbian flight attendant Vesna Vulovic served the flight of the DC-9 aircraft. Over Czechoslovakia, the plane exploded. The stewardess flew 10 km, being sandwiched between her seat, a trolley from the buffet and the body of another crew member. She landed on a snow-covered mountain slope and slid along it to a full stop. As a result, she received serious injuries, but remained alive.

If you are surrounded by something like a cocoon of debris, the probability of surviving a strike on the ground will be noticeably higher. This is Hamilton's opinion, based on convincing statistics. Since the 1940s, 31 such cases have been registered. Those who survived after a single free flight, much less - only 13 registered or credible cases. A superstar in this club of fantastic lucky ones is Alan Maggie, a military pilot from New Jersey. In 1943, when he was performing a combat mission in the skies of France, he was thrown out of a B-17 aircraft. Having flown 6 km, he pierced the roof of the railway station. Almost immediately, he was captured by the Germans, who were shocked to see him alive.

If you are going to fall, do not forget to grab a couple of points.Hamilton says that usually when falling, his eyes are very watery, which makes it difficult to choose the right place for landing.

For now, let's forget about whether you fall freely or have been able to cling to some piece of the fuselage. First of all, you should be interested in "final speed" (it is also "steady speed of falling"). The force of gravity pulls you down and tends to disperse. On the other hand, like any other moving object, you encounter a "drag" that grows with increasing your speed. At some point, these forces are balanced, and the acceleration stops, that is, you go to the "steady speed".

Depending on your weight, dimensions and density of the ambient air, you must accelerate to no more than 200 km / h, and this will happen in just five hundred meters of free flight. That is, having fallen from a skyscraper or from a ten-kilometer height, you will hit the ground with the same force. But from the roof of the skyscraper to the sidewalk you will fly in 12 seconds, and falling from the “airplane” height, you will have time to read the whole article.

07:00:20 The height of 6500 meters

By this time you have already descended into those layers of the atmosphere where you can breathe more or less freely. Consciousness returns to you. Two minutes to hit the ground.Your next task is to decide whether you want to live. If yes, then keep in mind that, as parachutists joke, “they die not from falling, but from landing.”

Without losing the presence of mind, try to aim.

Where to aim? Maggie crashed into the stone station floor, but his fall slowed down when he broke through the glass roof a moment before. It hurts, but saving. Will fit and a haystack. Some of the lucky ones survived, planting themselves in a dense shrub. The thicket is also quite good, although you can run into some bitch. Snow? Just perfect. Swamp? A soft vegetation covered bog is the most desirable option. Hamilton talks about a case when a skydiver with an unopened parachute landed directly on high-voltage wires. The wires spun and threw him up, saving his life. The most dangerous surface is water. Like concrete, it is practically incompressible. The result of falling on the ocean surface will be about the same as on the pavement. The only difference is that asphalt - alas! - it will not open beneath you to swallow the broken body forever.

Without losing sight of the intended goal, take up the position of your body.To reduce the speed of the fall, act like a parachutist with a long jump. Spread your legs and arms wider, tilt your head higher, straighten your shoulders, and you yourself will turn your chest towards the ground. Your frontal resistance will immediately grow, and there will be room for maneuver. The main thing - do not relax. Frankly, in your predicament, the question of how to prepare for a meeting with the land remains, unfortunately, not fully resolved. An article on this topic was published in the journal War Medicine from 1942. It said: "In an attempt to avoid injuries, the distribution of loads and their compensation play a big role." Hence the recommendation - you need to fall flat. On the other hand, the 1963 report, published by the Federal Aviation Agency (FAA), states that the classical group adopted among skydivers will be optimal for life saving: legs together, knees higher, legs pressed to the hips. In the same source, it is noted that survival in a catastrophe is greatly promoted by training in sports such as wrestling or acrobatics. When falling onto hard surfaces, it would be especially useful to have some skills in easternmartial arts.

The Japanese skydiver, Yasuhiro Kubo, trains as follows: he throws his parachute out of the plane, and then jumps himself. Delaying the process to the limit, he catches up with his equipment, puts on and after that pulls the ring. In 2000, Kubo jumped at a height of 3 km and spent 50 seconds in a free fall, until he reached his backpack with his parachute. All these useful skills can be worked out in a safer environment, for example, in free-fall simulators - vertical wind tunnels. However, the simulators will not allow you to work out the most crucial stage - meeting with the ground.

If you are waiting for the bottom of the water surface, get ready for quick and decisive action. For the surviving lovers to jump from high bridges, we can conclude that the entrance to the water would be the best "soldier", that is, feet first. Then you will have at least some chances to get to the surface alive.

On the other hand, famous divers from the rocks, honing their skills near Acapulco, believe that it is better to enter the water head first. At the same time, they place their hands with interlaced fingers in front of the head, protecting it from impact.You can choose any of these poses, but try to maintain a parachuting position until the very last second. Then, right on the water, if you prefer to dive "soldier", it is strongly recommended that you strain your buttocks with all your strength. Explain why, it would not be too decent, but you probably guess yourself.

Whatever surface you are waiting for below, do not land on your head. Researchers at the Institute for Road Safety came to the conclusion that in such situations, the main cause of death is a traumatic brain injury. If you still carry your head forward, better land on your face. It is safer than hitting the back of the head or the top of the skull.

07:02:19 The height of 300 meters

If, having fallen out of an airplane, you have started reading this article, then by now you have reached these lines. You already have the initial course, and now it's time to pull yourself together and focus on the task ahead of you. However, here is some additional information.

Statistics show that in the event of a catastrophe it is more profitable to be a crew member or a child, and if there is a choice, it is better to suffer a crash on a military plane.Over the past 40 years, at least 12 air crashes were recorded when only one person was still alive. In this list, four were crew members, and seven were passengers under the age of 18. Among the survivors is Mohammed el-Fateh Osman, a two-year-old child who survived the Boeing crash in Sudan in 2003, landing among its debris. Last June, when the Yemenia Airways airliner crashed near the Comoros, only 14-year-old Bahia Bakari survived.

The survival of crew members can be associated with more reliable passive safety systems, but why children are more likely to survive is not yet clear. In FAA studies, it is noted that in children, especially those under four years of age, there are more flexible bones, muscles are more relaxed and a higher percentage of subcutaneous fat effectively protects the internal organs. People of small stature - if their head does not protrude from behind the backs of aircraft seats - are well protected from flying debris. With a small body weight, the established fall rate will be lower, and a smaller frontal section reduces the chance to run into when landing on some sharp object.

07:02:25 Height 0 meters

So, come. Hit.Are you still alive? And what are your actions? If you get off with minor injuries, you can stand up and smoke, as did the British Nicholas Alkemeyd, the side gunners of the tail machine gun, which in 1944 after falling from a six-kilometer height landed in the snow-covered thicket. If no joke, then there is still a lot of trouble ahead of you.

Recall the case of Julian Copca. In 1971, on Christmas Eve, she flew a Lockheed Electra plane. The liner exploded somewhere over the Amazon. The 17-year-old German woman came to her senses the next morning under the canopy of the jungle. She was fastened to her seat, and around were piles of Christmas gifts. Wounded, all alone, she forced herself not to think about her dead mother. Instead, she focused on the advice of a biologist father: "Lost in the jungle, you will go out to the people, following the flow of water." Kopke was walking along the forest streams, which gradually merged into the rivers. She bypassed crocodiles and banged in shallow water with a stick to scare away stingrays. Somewhere, having stumbled, I lost a shoe, only a torn mini-skirt remained on her clothes. From her food she had only a bag of candy, and she had to drink dark, dirty water.She did not pay attention to the broken collarbone and the inflamed open wounds.

On the tenth day, moving along the river Shebonya, she saw a canoe pulled ashore. It took her several hours to climb along the coastal slope to the hut, where a team of lumberjacks discovered her the next day. In Peru, this incident was perceived as a miracle. Indeed, according to the statistics of the ACRO service, which records all air crashes, from 1940 to 2008, 118,934 people died in the result of the crash of 15,446 aircraft. Even if we add to this number parachutists who have not opened parachutes, only 157 lucky ones are able to tell about the miracle that happened to them. Of these, 42 are survivors of a fall from a height of more than 3 km.

True, the young Kopke did not agree that her salvation was the result of a miracle. When she tumbled in the air with her chair, the situation was not in her hands, but when she came to herself on the ground, she confidently took responsibility for her life in her own hands. "I managed to make the only right decision - to leave the crash site." At the parent biostation, she received the necessary experience for survival and then said: “I was not scared.I was taught to walk in the woods and behave properly on the river. I had to swim a lot among such dangerous animals as caimans and piranhas. ”

And now congratulations on a happy landing! You have already woken up, and the wheels of your aircraft are rolling along the runway. You are well aware that it is unlikely that you will ever need the information from this article in your life.

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  • 10 km without a parachute: what to do if you fell out of an airplane

    10 km without a parachute: what to do if you fell out of an airplane

    10 km without a parachute: what to do if you fell out of an airplane

    10 km without a parachute: what to do if you fell out of an airplane

    10 km without a parachute: what to do if you fell out of an airplane

    10 km without a parachute: what to do if you fell out of an airplane

    10 km without a parachute: what to do if you fell out of an airplane

    10 km without a parachute: what to do if you fell out of an airplane

    10 km without a parachute: what to do if you fell out of an airplane

    10 km without a parachute: what to do if you fell out of an airplane

    10 km without a parachute: what to do if you fell out of an airplane

    10 km without a parachute: what to do if you fell out of an airplane

    10 km without a parachute: what to do if you fell out of an airplane

    10 km without a parachute: what to do if you fell out of an airplane

    10 km without a parachute: what to do if you fell out of an airplane

    10 km without a parachute: what to do if you fell out of an airplane

    10 km without a parachute: what to do if you fell out of an airplane

    10 km without a parachute: what to do if you fell out of an airplane

    10 km without a parachute: what to do if you fell out of an airplane

    10 km without a parachute: what to do if you fell out of an airplane

    10 km without a parachute: what to do if you fell out of an airplane

    10 km without a parachute: what to do if you fell out of an airplane

    10 km without a parachute: what to do if you fell out of an airplane

    10 km without a parachute: what to do if you fell out of an airplane

    10 km without a parachute: what to do if you fell out of an airplane

    10 km without a parachute: what to do if you fell out of an airplane

    10 km without a parachute: what to do if you fell out of an airplane

    10 km without a parachute: what to do if you fell out of an airplane

    10 km without a parachute: what to do if you fell out of an airplane

    10 km without a parachute: what to do if you fell out of an airplane

    10 km without a parachute: what to do if you fell out of an airplane

    10 km without a parachute: what to do if you fell out of an airplane

    10 km without a parachute: what to do if you fell out of an airplane

    10 km without a parachute: what to do if you fell out of an airplane

    10 km without a parachute: what to do if you fell out of an airplane

    10 km without a parachute: what to do if you fell out of an airplane

    10 km without a parachute: what to do if you fell out of an airplane

    10 km without a parachute: what to do if you fell out of an airplane

    10 km without a parachute: what to do if you fell out of an airplane

    10 km without a parachute: what to do if you fell out of an airplane